Suzie Cordero
Finance Director

Suzie Cordero

Vice President Finance & Operations

On top of an enthusiasm and love for her community, Suzie brings to SBC over 30 years of financial management experience and has a talent for meticulous accounting and audit accountability. As the former Executive Director of READ (Rural Education and Development), she was able to take her passion for literacy and community development overseas and enjoyed traveling to Nepal on a number of occasions. Suzie held a real estate license for 15 years, has a background in property management, and has successfully overseen the financial management of several local businesses.

Personal Highlights:

Suzie’s interests include snowboarding, sewing, biking, golfing, waterskiing, hiking, and cheering on her favorite sports teams. 

Changing and Growing in the Town of Truckee

If there is one thing we can count on, it is change. I have been in the Truckee/North Lake Tahoe area for over 30 years and have seen Truckee change from a small town with a population of about 4,400 residents to one now with well over 16,000. Tourism has increased dramatically as well. I can recall when there were two very distinct shoulder seasons: one in the spring after the ski resorts closed and one in the fall after the summer tourism had subsided. You could walk down the street and it would not be unusual to know at least half of the people that you encountered. Recently though the winter and summer tourist seasons have started to blend into each other, creating a constant stream of new faces to encounter.

COMM SC Blog GrantKayeImage ChangingTruckee 2013 12With such an increase in visitors and permanent residents, it’s no surprise that the Lake Tahoe Region is thought by many to be a fantastic place to live and recreate. Living in a tourist economy does, however, come with a price. With such an influx of visitors during the peak winter and summer seasons it can become near impossible to get across town quickly, let alone get in and out of the grocery store! There is no doubt; one quickly learns to shop at non-peak hours of the day. The growth in tourism has of course had huge upsides for the community as well. It may not have been quite that difficult to get around 30 years ago, but things are without a doubt much easier and convenient today. Examples include an elaborate, and growing, public transportation system and the joy of getting to listen to our local radio station any time – it used to go off the air at midnight.

So while the industry has its drawbacks, tourism has been a great economy for Lake Tahoe. It has generated numerous funding streams for road maintenance/expansion, infrastructure improvements, increased amenities and so much more. As residents, visitors, or just admirers of the region, we all want to celebrate Lake Tahoe and its surrounding communities, and we all want to make it even better. By Supporting the Sierra Business Council you help steward this outcome as well as directly support SBC’s efforts to promote, develop and amplify the Sierra Nevada and its local communities’ social, environmental and economic capital.

One of my deepest desires is that all people on the planet will make it their quest to make this a sustainable planet for ourselves now, and for all future generations. I am proud to say that SBC’s work is helping make that happen. So while change is inevitable, why not do what we can to make sure it’s positive change?

 

 

Photo courtesy of Grant Kaye & the Town of Truckee

Comments

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Kathryn Benedict MacRoberts commented on Dec 06, 2013
When you look at the economy these days and lack of jobs that are full time with benefits, look at the amount of items manufactured abroad, small companies bought up by big ones then shut down, people loosing their houses and not being able to feed their families many communities need to look at what they can for local revenues. If that means relying on a tourist economy to bring in some of that money or having the community die there is no question on what they should do. But that should only be a start, many tourist attractions are seasonal and an influx so lots of people and businesses suffer on the off months. This can cause worse problems and is where the community needs to focus on working together and helping each other. Building the local market and attractions to create a more stable environment, work within the community instead of outsourcing, collaborate to pool efforts and find ways to stack functions and deversify the sources if income for the community.
Dai Meagher commented on Dec 07, 2013
Good thoughs Katheryn. Too much reliance on tourism can be unstable. Finding ways to diversify the economy seems like a good path.
Kathryn Benedict MacRoberts commented on Dec 07, 2013
Thank you Dal.